Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Belt System

Jiu-Jitsu belts are solid color. Each level has 4 stripes. Belt promotions are always at the discretion of the Head Coach. Factors such as above-average class attendance, natural ability, or competing could possibly shorten the time to belt promotions, while a poor attitude, bad temper, poor attendance, or a lack of common morality outside the school could lengthen it.

White Belt

All new students in the Jiu-Jitsu Program will receive a white belt as soon as they begin training. New students will learn how to roll, fall, shrimp, escape, throw, and find strategic positional advantages. Every class gives them one or two tools to use in their sparring matches.

Blue Belt

On average, 10 to 14 months of training with a minimum of 100 to 120 classes plus total competency of specific techniques in each category: throws and takedowns, self-defense, passing the guard, closed guard, escapes, and submissions. Blue belts have endured enough rigorous training hours to be proficient in almost any self-defense situation. Blue belts have a significant advantage to jiu-jitsu newcomers on the mat.

Purple Belt

On average, 3 -5 years of training with a minimum of 360 classes plus total competency of specific techniques in each category: throws and takedowns, self-defense, passing the guard, guard play, escapes, and submissions. The purple belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is like a black belt in most other martial arts. Purple belts can defend themselves in real-life situations, have tournament experience, and can successfully teach jiu-jitsu to others. Purple belts start to develop their unique jiu-jitsu styles derived from the countless techniques they’ve been exposed to and hour upon hour of mat time.

Brown Belt

On average, 6 years of training with a minimum of 750 classes plus total competency of specific techniques in each category: throws and takedowns, self-defense, passing the guard, mastery of the many types of guards, escapes, and submissions. The brown belt is nearly approaching black belt level. Brown belts need to prove themselves to the Head Coach and the rest of the team to get past the hurdle of earning their black belt.

Black Belt

Getting  your black belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu is a big deal. Hours and hours of training, countless tournaments, and many classes attended and taught to others. In the world of Brazilian jiu-jitsu, reaching a black belt proves you have the dedication to master the art. There’s a saying that says: “The black belt is a white belt who never quit.” Trying to quantify what it takes to be a black belt in jiu-jitsu is almost dishonorable. It’s not x amount of classes, y amount of techniques, and z amount of tournament victories. It’s different for everyone. As any top black belt will tell you…reaching your black belt is only the beginning.

Competitions

Students are strongly encouraged to compete, but it is not a requirement. However, since tournament experience will significantly improve your jiu-jitsu game, the Head Coach does take your tournament experience into account when considering your belt promotion, especially among the higher belts.

Try a Free Class

New jiu-jitsu students currently get their first 3 classes free, so try it out and see what you think.

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